The Truth

audience Reviews

65% Audience Score65%
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    Superb performances by Deneuve and Binoche as an estranged mother and daughter trying to sort through their issues before it is too late. I wondered if the dead character Sarah was supposed to evoke Deneuve's late sister Francoise Dorleac.
  • 1 of 5 stars
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    put title in french or its false advertising
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    Apacible y disfrutable.
  • 3 of 5 stars
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    Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda follows up his critically acclaimed Shoplifters with his first film outside Japan, a French language film which paints a portrait of a strangely loving and honest relationship between a supposedly neglectful and diva-ish famous actress mother, Fabienne (Catherine Deneuve playing perhaps a bad version of herself) and her screenwriter daughter, Lumir (Juliette Binoche) who escaped to NYC by marrying an American actor (Ethan Hawke, charming but underused, and now needs to work with Irene Jacob to finish off his Three Colours bingo card). Conflicts and confrontations are all set to erupt when Lumir returns to visit on the eve of the launch of Fabienne's less than truthful autobiography called La Vérité (or The Truth in English); while shooting a science fiction movie about a mother-daughter relationship in which Fabienne ironically plays the neglected daughter. However, Kore-eda's take is surprisingly understating (and often subtly humorous), despite all the thematic and philosophical ironies and juxtapositions that's present here, and often undercuts the dramatic potential by cutting away and having the conflicts left decidedly unresolved after bringing it up to the forefront. Characters and subplots gently glide in and out of frame but it never loses its grip on the main attraction that is the mother-daughter relationship which it slowly fleshes out across the duration of the film. Watching Deneuve and Binoche sparring and interacting on-screen is such pure joy, I was happy to overlook what others might consider slight, inconsequential or anticlimactic. In a lot of ways, it is an even more muted beast than Shoplifters, yet there is so much grace and composure, both in their relationship and in the film, that I find it all the more mesmerizing as a result.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    Entertaining and comes together well.
  • 1.5 of 5 stars
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    Omg...if you want to suffer through an hour and 47 minutes of sheer boredom, then this is the movie for you.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    Two acting legends, Catherine Denueve and Juliette Binoche, face off in this hidden French gem by Japanese director, Hirokazu Koreeda. Fabienne (Deneuve) is a famous actress in the autumn of her career. Once the Belle of the cinema, she is now acting in a supporting role in a film headlined by a much younger actress. She writes a memoir that gets her renewed attention by the press, but it also triggers a visit from her screenwriter daughter, Lumir (Binoche), who wants to discuss the "inaccuracies" portrayed in her famous mother's book. Little by little, the audience learns who and what Fabienne was willing to sacrifice to remain the ultimate actress, all the while refusing to face the trail of broken hearts and lives left in her wake. Though the film is not hugely dramatic, it is film-lover's dream with the likes of Deneuve and Binoche, helmed by Palme d'Or winning director, Koreeda. It's a fun watch, especially for cinephiles who are familiar with Deneuve's illustrious real-life career and will appreciate the one-line zingers uttered by the French cinema icon. Fabienne is unlike Deneuve in real life, so claims the actress herself, but even the character's name is based on Deneuve's actual middle-name. When watching the film, one has to wonder: where does fantasy end and the truth begin?
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    The Truth is a very fine film with an interesting story line with a clever take on acting and family relationships. It's such a great pleasure to see two such masters on the screen together. 3.7 stars
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    Catherine Deneuve is superb. Her subtle facial expressions that say a thousand words. The humour that makes a possible unlikeable character so captivating and enjoyable. Played to perfection Ms Deneuve
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    You will like it, if you like Hirokazu Kore-eda !