The Nightingale

audience Reviews

73% Audience Score73%
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    Brutal, interesting, brilliant and it makes you feel like you are living ALONG with the characters, the acting and the scenery doesn't make it feel like you are watching a movie but to actually be there with them, making it a great film.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    Brutal, upsetting, well done.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    It's tough sometimes, but it's well worth it.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    entertaining movie but the story could have been better written.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    This is not an easy watch, as it as brutal as the times she is portraying, but it is definitely one to watch. Jennifer Kent has made a very powerful film telling an important story.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    Thought it was a gem, couldn't stop watching and wondering about man's inhumanity to others. This will always be timely until we all acknowledge our histories & cultures.
  • 3 of 5 stars
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    Started off really good, some very intense graphic scenes, then the 2nd half dragged on for a while unfortunately, could have chopped out 1/2hr and not missed much.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    The disturbing elements come out naturally in the characters' actions, instead of the film trying too hard to shock the audience, as is common in many films. While it's a revenge story, the twist is unique with an impactful, realistic message. The periodic setting (colonial Australia) was depicted with many ugly truths of human nature in mind.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    During the days of Australia's colonization, Clare in an Irish convict who has been in the 'care' of her master Lieutenant Hawkins for 7 years but who now refuses to release her so that she may marry her husband. When her husband confronts the lieutenant and his men it ends in violence and tragedy. With the British army unwilling to take action against their men, Clare pursues them across the Australian wilderness with the help of a local aborginal guide to exact her own vengenace against those who attacked her and her family. The first thing to say about The Nightingale is you're going to need a strong nerve to get through the ordeal of Clare and her family being attacked, the brutality of the attack is shocking and unnerving. From this point on the film is an exploration of vengeance and prejudice. Clare hires a local aboriginal tribesman to guide her to her prey despite her own prejudices against this man and what he represents. However, prejudices are set aside as they both travel through some of the most dangerous parts of 19th century Australia and eventually, might even be close to considering themselves friends by the time the credits roll. It also looks at vengeance and what it means once vengeance has been achieved and where do we go when vengeance doesn't give us the closure we were expecting. It is a very well made film if a little hard to stomach in places but once you begin you will want to follow Clare's journey through to the end.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    The Nightingale is hard to watch, and for good reason. This film takes place in Tasmania during the Black War and explores the terrifying realities of assault, rape, abuse, murder, loss, sexism, racism, and genocide. Phew. What a list. Don't say I didn't warn you. The performances in The Nightingale are fantastic and almost too convincing. Aisling Franciosi and Baykali Ganambarr pull off emotional and heartbreaking performances as Clare and Billy. Sam Claftin is shocking as Lt Hawkin, who may be one of the most terrifying, un-remorseful villains in recent film history. The cinematography is not stunning nor is it bad. Clare's character develops some, but never fully, and her nightmare sequences are unnecessary and out of place in this brutal, realistic setting. Billy's character, however, is full of nuance, humor, and sorrow. The ending of The Nightingale is only halfway satisfactory. Lt Hawkin and his Sergeant meet their well-deserved demise, and Clare and Billy escape, but is it enough? There seems to be something missing. Clare backtracks her revenge and allows Billy to have it instead, which could be seen as a good choice, for he has lost so much and witnessed so many horrors as well. However, this leaves nothing for Clare, except a (kind of lame) proclamation that she belongs to herself. This is where the purpose of The Nightingale is lost to me. Is this a tale about female agency and revenge? Is it a tale about the horrors of the Black War and human cruelty? Is it all of this and more? Probably. But it's a lot to take in one movie that is essentially a two-hour long chase. I don't think I would have been disappointed if I sat this one out. It is purposely not an enjoyable film, though it is effective and important. The Nightingale is as long and as grueling as Clare and Billy's travels through the wilderness. Towards the end I was glancing at the clock every few minutes, hoping the end was near.