Never Rarely Sometimes Always

audience Reviews

67% Audience Score67%
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    Llena de una narrativa sencilla y bien estructurada. Nos platica muchas cosas sin diálogos. Cosas que tal vez no queramos o debamos saber. Nos lleva a la médula de las cosas, de los problemas, de las relaciones. Nos deja en la opción múltiple de nada, poco o mucho. Talia Ryder acompaña perfectamente al personaje de Sidney. Le da fuerza tanto en la trama como en las decisiones que toma. Le va dando forma a una Autumn que parece ser que aún no comprende todo lo que le esta sucediendo y lo que va a cambiar en su vida. Y nos recuerda la engañosa sencillez de la adolescencia. La vida es un par de dolares y un camión a NY.
  • 0.5 of 5 stars
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    Worst movie I've ever seen!!!!!!! I have lost all confidence in rotten tomatoes!
  • 0.5 of 5 stars
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    I'm just confused because I just spent 2 hours watching a movie where literally not a single thing happens. Most boring movie I've ever seen in my life. Now I'm going to spend the rest of my life making a list of all the things with which I could have better used my time.
  • 1 of 5 stars
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    There was no point to this movie. Literally I just watch a girl try and go get an abortion, And none of the uniting problems got solved. Such a rip off.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    MULTIPLE CHOICES - My Review of NEVER RARELY SOMETIMES ALWAYS (4 Stars) As much as I liked Eliza Hittman's last film, Beach Rats, I wrote at the time that despite having style to burn, I wasn't convinced she had anything new to say. It came across as a Larry Clark/Terrence Malick/Andrea Arnold summit meeting. With her new film, Never Rarely Sometimes Always, she has truly found her voice and a deceptively simple filmmaking style to produce a quietly profound, devastating film. Newcomer Sidney Flanigan plays Autumn, a 17-year-old girl who performs at the high school talent show when we first meet her. With her family in the audience, she suffers the humiliation of a male classmate coughing up the word "slut" and finds the strength to keep going. It's a beautiful yet painful way to paint a quick picture of this character. Soon thereafter, she discovers she's pregnant. After a failed attempt to self-terminate and encountering many barriers at a local clinic, she runs from her small town Pennsylvania town to Manhattan in search of an abortion. She brings her cousin Skylar (Talia Ryder) along for emotional support on what they think will be quick daylong trip. Of course, this task proves much more arduous than they had initially thought, leaving the pair stranded in the city with little money and no place to stay. Hittman has written a bare bones story but has delivered complex emotions in every single scene. Eschewing melodrama and histrionics, Hittman opts for subtlety in order to expose the micro-agressions aimed at women in our society. Back at home, the girls work together at a market in which their manager forces himself on them in the most disturbing way. I had to rewatch the scene a few times to catch what he was doing, and in that moment, Hittman's theme of young girls navigating a patriarchal society without necessarily having the best tools to do so, slowly emerged. Autumn faces a hard-drinking stepfather (Ryan Eggold of New Amsterdam) who clearly has a dark past with her, but Hittman never feels the need to spell things out. We experience the male gaze from Autumn and Skylar's perspectives and it says it all without ever resorting to over-writing or speechifying. Furthermore, Autumn, a sullen personality on a good day, delivers her entire history to us without every spelling it out. You see it in the way she never asks people how they are after they ask it of her. She has clearly been through some harsh experiences, but she has her walls up to protect herself. One spectacular scene, however, which explains the movie's title, finds her answering personal questions from a social worker. Each one triggers deep-seated emotions, causing her to barely answer the most terrifying of them. Her crumbling face tells the whole, terrible story. It's one of the least fussy powerhouse scenes I've witnessed in a long time. Flanigan and Ryder also make fantastic debuts with these fine, subtle, lived-in performances. Using a largely female crew, Hittman gets phenomenal work from her cinematographer, Hélène Louvart who has the gift of a documentarian's eye combined with the ability to bring us one beautifully framed, naturally lit image after another. Autumn and Skylar often appear together in many shots which skillfully show their alternately close or distant moments. I particularly loved a scene in which Skylar kisses a young man (Théodore Pellerin) they befriend behind a pole as Autumn reaches out her hand to get Skylar's attention. It's difficult to balance a cinema verite, almost real time style with one that's thought out and composed, but Hittman and Louvart pull it off seamlessly. I loved that Hittman chose not to fill the film with the usual New York City terrors. It's enough to watch our two leads lug a suitcase around in the rain, to ride the subways all night, and worry about who approaches them. We see a man pleasuring himself in front of them on the subway, yet the way these young women exist in their surroundings packs more punch. A lovely scene in which Skylar applies makeup to a tired, hungry Autumn perfectly found the tenderness and survival instincts this pair possesses. Moreover, they behave like real teenagers. Without eye rolls or snappy dialogue, this pair use a less is more approach to reveal the quiet hellscape of their lives. This terse, blank style works so much better than screaming to the back rows. Hittman doesn't have a loud message for her audience when a muffled scream will suffice. Never Rarely Sometimes Always is small on incident and showy scenes, yet it still manages to roar.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    This movie is absolutely fantastic, not the type to recommend to everyone due to its controversial subject, however, if you're seeking for a serious and mature drama then you'd love to see it. Standout performance by both of the girls in the main characters. Authentic movie from start to end perfectly handled by the director despite the controversial subject and with a very realistic screenplay.
  • 0.5 of 5 stars
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    Biased. Obviously. Not realistic.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    It was an important topic and an examination of what a young girl has to do when she's put in an impossible situation. It's also a beautiful story about friendship, family, and female strength.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    Slow, soft and strong, with a sense of innocence. Several big close-ups and POVs. The implications of the nose-piercing and the hands-holding scenes are quite manifest. The long-take of the titular scene really builds up the vibe to a touching and affecting moment. By the way, I really hate that people easily call this kind of piece a feminist film, which is exactly some sort of the patriarchal thought: Never Self-critical; Rarely Self-sacrificing; Sometimes Self-indulgent; Always Self-important.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    I felt as though I was there every step of the way with the girls on their journey. Unapologetically raw, real and does a wonderful job of showing the emotional turmoil involved in such decisions.