Minari

audience Reviews

, 92% Audience Score
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    What’s there to hate - except subtitles if you didn’t learn to read in school. It’s a realistic immigrant family’s ‘American Dream’ story with relatable ideas and characters.
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    A gentle, subtle, charming, and sometimes very moving immigration story based on the writer/director, Lee Isaac Chung's, own family experience when he was a small boy and his family struggled to achieve the American Dream after migrating from Korea. The acting is excellent, the slow-paced story will, I assume, resonate with anyone who travels to a new country to begin a new life. The story is shot through with humour generated by the circumstances and the characters — there's no attempt to be funny; some of the people and events are inherently funny. There's pain and tragedy, too. The cinematography is beautiful, too. It's a delightful story if a little too long and too slow. And the orderliness of the plot doesn't really seem consistent with the messy chaos of the family and what it is going through. It's all a bit too "tidy". But MIRANI is worth seeing as a way to gain insight to what many families must experience who have to cope with what, to them, are strange people in a strange land.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    Sweet with good performances - but not particularly memorable or significant. Fun to see Steven Yeun outside of his Walking Dead character.
  • Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Perfect soundtrack, beautiful cinematography and Yuh-Jung Youn's performance is breathtaking. Best film of 2020 by far
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    Farming Simulator: Korean Edition
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    I loved everything. Its harder to find good movies anymore that dont have violence or basically porn on a movie now. It was very heartfelt, and I loved seeing the wholesomeness. Its one that warms your heart seeing a family working together. I felt at home since I began watching kdramas as a teen. It was good to see a different perspective of a Korean American life. The grandma was hilarious! Very good acting. 5 stars, A+, 2 thumbs up! Hwaiting!
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    This is the movie that should win the Oscar for best picture, flat out, hands down, no questions asked. Director Lee Isaac Chung's heartfelt domestic drama about a South Korean immigrant family seeking a fresh start and a better tomorrow in 1980s rural Arkansas is just the kind of movie that we need right now, much as "Moonlight" was the film we needed in 2016. The picture's exquisite cinematography, nuanced script and narrative, and superb ensemble cast make for a moving cinematic experience that leaves viewers with a warm glow that lasts long after the movie's final frame. Richly deserving of the many accolades and award nominations it has received thus far, "Minari" truly stands out among this year's field of contenders, masterfully and lovingly handled in virtually every respect. I can't speak highly enough about the quality of this film and its power to help heal an ailing nation.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Breaks your heart and mends it with a honest story about the American dream
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    It was a good story with great acting. 90% of it was good. The ending was anticlimactic. The storylines didn't really come to a close. The movie title and how it related to the movie didn't sync up.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Clearly one on 2020's top films in terms of craft, execution and future award recognition, Minari is a beautiful achievement on all fronts. The film is telling the simple, yet undoubtedly meaningful story of a Korean family trying to make a living in 1980's America, comprised of Stephen Yeun's Jacob, a down on his luck working man suffering defeat after defeat, Yeri Han's Monica, a wife on the verge of declaring herself defeated and quitting on their risky journey and their two young precocious children. Soon, the children's grandmother, a very funny and endearing Youn Yuh-jung enters their lives right as Jacob is trying to make a living from farming in their small, isolated Arkansas land. Chung is a quiet filmmaker. He finds the beauty of his subject within the small moments of a downtrodden family, turning their lives into a harmoniously constructed painting of love and suffering. A masterclass in both cultural entanglement and exploration of the human soul, Minari highlights manages to paint his characters' portraits not only by placing them, as a family, in the middle of an alien community, but also in a transcendent relationship with nature itself.