Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound

audience Reviews

93% Audience Score93%
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconHalf Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    This doc on the innovations and history of sound in the movies, does exactly what the filmmakers wanted. Credit to the the minds behind this endeavor for sitting down with some of the biggest names in sound design and the directors who valued their work. This isn't about the way the sounds are made so if you're looking for that, look elsewhere. I could have used some more (any) John Williams, but when you do a project like this you may not be able to sit down with all the people you want. Williams needs his voice heard even if it was audio from another source. It's a glaring omission to an otherwise fine film. There's a lot of ground to cover, but the old cliche remains; if you like this kinda thing, you'll like this kinda thing! Final Score: 6.5/10
  • 4 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    If you're a fan of cinema and audio, Making Waves: The Art Of Cinematic Sound is a fascinating and informative documentary movie. But I had a few issues with the film . . . . 1. Even though Ioan Allen was interviewed, Making Waves neglected to mention other major contributions of Dolby Laboratories to surround sound in movies, like Dolby Stereo and Atmos. 2. They hardly mentioned anything about Jack Foley--you know, the man they named foley sound effects after. 3. Making Waves featured so many legends in the movie industry, so how can you talk about film scores and not interview John Williams!?! 4. And what about Lucasfilm THX, who helped elevate presentation quality standards for movies in cinema and home? Granted, there's a lot to cover in the history of cinema sound, but the film overlooked some of the most significant contributions made by others.
  • 4 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    Another fascinating look at a sometimes neglected element of movie-making. Many of us have long held that one appreciates great movies via the ears more than the eyes. In this 90-minute overview - arguably over-focused on the Zoetrope 70s club of Walter Murch/Ben Burtt/Gary Rydstrom - we are reminded how much of our enjoyment of the cinematic experience is directed, often subliminally, by these expert technicians. It's only a pity that the focus here is so narrow.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconHalf Star Icon
    Eye opening film. Thrilling to take a sneak peak behind the scenes on the evolution of sound.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconHalf Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    Really good for starting filmmakers or people interested in sound department in film. For people already in the film business or film student graduates ot doesn't add much, but still good to review and maybe expand a little on sound recording history and sound design, editing, and mixing. To me it was specially interesting on the making of film scores.
  • 5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconFull Star Icon
    Everyone who loves movies should watch this!