Joker

audience Reviews

88% Audience Score88%
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    One of the nicely told villain stories in a while. You see his descent into madness well told and shows, in a very plausible way, how the Joker could've become the monster we know him to be in pop culture today in a modern-day light. A great performance from everyone in this film is shown, especially through Joaquin Phoenix as the Joker.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    Glad to watch on Amazon Prime this 2 hour insanity into the world of the Joker where Gotham city is ruled by wealthy white supremacy. Classic boast-wealth stereotype is Batman's father who seems to act like I am rich and superior and sees a majority of poor-class citizens mostly white people as idiot clowns. As for the Joker himself, the laughter is still in its early stages of insanity not quite there yet where clothing will become more varied in fashion as his character progresses into becoming a crime lord with powerful leadership over his gang of clown citizens in future life events. I sense another Joker movie sequel /*\
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    Joker is a depressing movie about a man's fall into madness.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    While I do really like this film a lot, and Joaquin Phoenix did a great job as the Joker. I do think this film is very overrated and it wasn't as action packed as other superhero films like "Logan" and the "Deadpool" movies.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    Flawless. 6 out of 5. Pheonix's portrayal of Joker is chilling precisely because he embellishes so little, and unlike Heath Ledger's unbelievably cunning and charismatic Joker, we are left to believe that a man (or many men) with the same thoughts and history as Arthur Fleck actually exist(s) in the real world. He's the opposite of a super-villain; the film makes clear there's absolutely nothing super about him. The social conditions, too, are raw and undeniably real. Budget cuts force Arthur to lose his medicine. He and many others live in poverty and constant anxiety. There are no social resources for him to turn to for help. It's a dark, cruel social condition we know today as capitalist realism. As we see, the only logical, or inevitable, solution is revolution.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    Pretty amazing cinematography and an incredible score, but Joaquin Phoenix was most definitely the star of the show, in one of the greatest performances this decade. I was disappointed in Todd Phillips directing, but the writing was pretty good, and overall, I recommend.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    It's pretty good. I'm not quite sure where the Joker goes from sympathetic to not in my mind, but it happens somewhat imperceptibly as the film goes by. I enjoyed watching it, and am glad I did so. But that said the hype from some quarters about this seems a bit over the top to me. Somewhat above average but it's not going to blow your socks off or anything.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    Joker Story: The origin tale of the Joker (Joaquin Phoenix) – one of the most iconic villains in comic book history. Joker Review: Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix) isn't happy with his life. He struggles to make money as a part-time clown while sharing a rundown apartment with his ailing mom (Frances Conroy). But Arthur lives in a city struck by hard times where a decent, honest living is difficult to come by. He also suffers from a condition that causes him to break into uncontrollable laughter. None of this stops Arthur from dreaming big. He aspires to be a stand-up comedian and attempts to write jokes in his diary. Caught in between it all, Arthur slowly begins to lose his grip on sanity. It's immediately apparent that this is not your standard comic book fare. Todd Phillips painstakingly constructs the story of a man at his wit's end when pushed beyond his breaking point. Phillips doesn't glorify mental illness but instead makes a compelling case of a deeply disturbed individual struggling to find a coping mechanism in the form of an unhinged alter ego. This also resonates in his gritty vision of Gotham City, a metropolis brought to its knees, and crime is just a way of life. Only the rich and corrupt seem to be unaffected by the mayhem – a pertinent notion in present times. Set in the early 80's, this fictional city is reminiscent of that era with impeccable production and a time-relevant, yet unsettling soundtrack that evokes a constant sense of uneasiness. Arthur Fleck's gradual descent into madness has a distant parallel to ‘Taxi Driver', also featuring Robert De Niro, so there's a sense of joy for the cinephile to see him here. But, none of the cast holds a candle to Joaquin Phoenix in the titular role, captured by a dedicated and immersive performance. Watching Phoenix disappear into character makes one fear the actor's sanity as he creates his own unique version of the villain. At first, his wiry, awkward frame stumbles to get from one place to the next, but when he eventually transforms, he becomes graceful, resembling an agile dancer. It's simultaneously difficult to watch and yet, impossible to take your eyes off him. If Joaquin Phoenix finally wins an Academy Award for this performance, it will be hard to argue against it. Disturbing and intense, yet undeniably brilliant, this may very well become the definitive origin tale of the Joker.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    Gotham City has always represented the worst of America's urban cities. To my knowledge, Todd Phillips' Joker is the first of the Gotham based films to explore how this DC Comics city is a breeding ground for homicidal maniacs. It's mesmerizing, disturbing and, while not for everyone, a masterpiece.
  • 0.5 of 5 stars
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    I should have spent 2 hours watching paint dry. A struggle to watch all the way through. Not entertaining at all.