Jawline

critic Reviews

96% Fresh Tomatometer Score96%
  • Jawline uses one man's bid for online stardom to offer a compassionate, clear-eyed view of the risks and seductive allure of social media.
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Glenn DunksThe Film Experience
    A documentary cousin to Eighth Grade.
    Read full article
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Justin KirklandEsquire Magazine
    The subject of Liza Mandelup's first feature may be live streaming, but it speaks to a generation's painful reckoning with what it means to come of age online.
    Read full article
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Renee SchonfeldCommon Sense Media
    Eye-opening docu about rising social media star; cursing.
    Read full article
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Lael LoewensteinFilmWeek (KPCC - NPR Los Angeles)
    It was scary to me. I thought "Wow, the young people are so easily swayed by [social media]."
    Read full article
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Brenden GallagherThe Daily Dot
    If you've ever had a dream, no matter where you're from, this film is worth your attention.
    Read full article
  • Rotten Tomatometer Score
    Richard BrodyNew Yorker
    [Mandelup] rushes from clip to clip, from sound bite to sound bite; the results are superficial and frustrating.
    Read full article
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Jenna BenchetritNonfics
    The documentary's most notable strength is how it values the young, overwhelmingly female fans of social media influencers.
    Read full article
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Joel KellerDecider
    Despite the film's flaws, it will be a good primer for parents to show them what their kids might be doing on their phones and laptops.
    Read full article
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Marisa CarpicoThe Pop Break
    It's easy to dismiss social media as superficial, but the brilliance of Jawline is in its willingness to admit that it wouldn't be so dangerous if it weren't also so appealing.
    Read full article
  • Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Todd GilchristTheWrap
    Offers a surprisingly compassionate look not just at one rural Tennessee kid's bid for virtual stardom, but also at the digital celebrity-industrial complex that perpetuates itself by dehumanizing people into content-generating commodities.
    Read full article