French Exit

audience Reviews

, 43% Audience Score
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    "French Exit" takes you out into a moody dark comedy which definitely showcases the talents and beauty of Michelle Pfeiffer as she moves to Paris with her 20 something son and a black cat. The son is intentionally emotionless and sometimes exudes a hint of pathos. The cat is focused on by the camera to foreshadow a secret. I'll not detail the plot but just say it moves along at a languid pace punctuated by occasionally funny, absurd and surprising moments. It's a quirky, interesting film that in spite of the pace manages to hold your attention for the 110 minute running time. It's a good social experience film if you like to talk about existential issues afterwards with friends or a date. The movie held my interest but I had a hard time enjoying it. I kept reacting to it with mundane annoyance even as I realized this was contrary to the genre's intention. I'd let myself go with the flow for awhile only to be surprised by my feelings of outrage at how morally obtuse Pfeiffer's character was with respect to her son. (MILD SPOILER START) It was annoying that he seemed to be unconcerned that due to her actions he was being deprived of any apparent skills or safety net to help him keep up a decent life. (MILD SPOILER END) There was also a subplot with her son's fiancée that seemed pointless. I had a self-realization that some of this was my natural lack of patience for movies about wealthy people as someone who grew up without it. Nevertheless I liked the movie's exploration of friendship. And the few scenes of Paris I saw made me wish more of it had taken place outside. I recommend seeing the movie with friends if you want a conversation starter. But if you've got better things to do on your own, skip it.
  • Rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars
    The premise is interesting and there is definitely an enjoyable performance by Pfeiffer in a scathing depiction of rich people life. But apart from a few good lines and awkwardly funny situations the movie slow pacing and lack of thrills can become kind of a letdown. Would have benifited from being shorter and less obvious.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Honestly entertaining
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    IN A NUTSHELL: Sony Pictures presents a dramedy about an aging Manhattan socialite living on what's barely left of her inheritance who moves to a small apartment in Paris with her son and cat. It's based on the best-selling book by Patrick deWitt called French Exit: A Novel . The quirky film features one of the best performances of Michelle Pfeiffer's career. The title gets its name from the slang term for leaving an engagement or situation without warning or without saying goodbye. You'll see several illustrations of that concept in the movie by various characters. THINGS I LIKED: Who doesn't adore Academy Award nominee Michelle Pfeiffer? She is as beautiful and compelling as ever in her role in this film. She said she loved making this movie and that it ranked in the top 5 of her movie-making career. Since we're talking about numbers, Slant Magazine ranked Pfeiffer's performance among the top 20 of 2020. It even garnered her a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress. Her outstanding performance is, by far, the reason to watch this movie. Another Academy Award nominee, Lucas Hedges, also delivers a solid performance. Did you know he's the son of poet and actress Susan Bruce and Oscar-nominated screenwriter and director Peter Hedges? There's something really special about Imagen Poots. I can never keep my eyes off her when she's in a scene. New York City and Paris are two of the lovely characters in the film. The outstanding cast also includes Valerie Mahaffey, Susan Coyne, Danielle Macdonald, and the voice of Tracy Letts. THINGS I DIDN'T LIKE: All of the characters are so ridiculously quirky and dysfunctional. Their whimsical personalities are entertaining at first, but then become annoying by the end. The problem is that we simply can't identify with any of them. The story itself is odd, slow-paced, and doesn't really go anywhere. It kind of reminded me of Woody Allen movies, yet not nearly as charming or funny. I'm told that the cat is a clear and important character in DeWitt's book, but in the movie, it's just another random persona. TIPS FOR PARENTS: Premarital relations You see a frozen male body part. Profanity and some crude language, including F-bombs You can see the rest of my review on my Movie Review Mom YouTube channel!
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Michelle Pfeiffer is captivating. When she came to her clichéd end - did she return as a pussy¿
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Do you ever feel that you've had adulthood thrust upon you at too young an age? And that... you're still essentially a child... mimicking the behaviors of the grown-ups all around you so they won't uncover the meager contents of your heart? A few minutes in, I thought this is going to be one of these movies that adopt some sort of a false pretense in order to satirize the rich and upper class. Well, as I finished the movie I still think it is. But the story's attempts to dodge clichés surrounding this type of films had me constantly not only striving to classify it, but also quite baffled to know what's the point of it in the first place. Suffice it to say, it meanders a lot, especially regarding its tone which I'm not sure either the first act or Pfeiffer's magnetic performance as the delightfully sardonic Frances Price were enough to set it properly. As I said, it's meandering. And the whimsy of it being turned up to eleven in spasmodic bursts — while perfectly suits the oddball characters and the Anderson-esque style the movie has about it — feels a bit incongruous with the tender and emotive core of the story that I could catch glimpses of as the story progresses and its caustic layer being peeled off sporadically. With some touches that border on surrealism, I believe the movie become very close to going completely off the rails in its latter half to the point of stretching its believability a little too far. But everything was done efficiently and with great panache so much so I couldn't help reconciling myself with whatever this film is trying to achieve and I think I was well rewarded by the end. I finally could figure out what it is about — hopefully. Without getting into details to avoid spoiling anything, I think French Exit is a character study of a woman, Frances Price, who tries to break away from the phony life she leads. She's fundamentally a good and "real" person, but she's confined to the stereotypes of her aristocratic social strata. She takes a huge step towards fulfilling her purpose, only to find that the consequences of such action come arbitrarily and at a time she's neither financially, mentally nor emotionally prepared for, the thing that resulted in her having a midlife crisis of sorts. Lucas Hedges does an excellent job at complementing this with his understated performance as Frances's son, Malcolm. But Pfeiffer really knocked it out of the park here! A bizarre satirical dramedy that might not be everyone's cup of tea, but it's definitely worth checking out.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Loved the characters and how they developed.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Loved it. Michelle seemed as though she was also clairvoyant
  • Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    This may be the best movie I've watched in five years. The character sketches and the drily witty dialogue, paired with the weirdness of the circumstances, made this a compelling viewing. I loved the movie more than I've enjoyed a lot of real world for the past year and a half.
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    It could have been shorter, I think the movie was too long for the story it tells. It would be more enjoying if it was really 1 hour 43 minutes (it is 2 hour 10 minutes in reality).